Problems with Git.

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Problems with Git.

Owen Thomas-2
Hello again.

I am seeing some issues with committing a Git code base in Netbeans.

When I commit from the root directory, I observe that some blue cylinders remain. I right-click on the root node, select Git -> Show Changes, and nothing appears. When I check out a new copy of the code base and open it in Netbeans, I get compile-time errors.

I can get rid of the errors, and in many cases, the blue cylinders also disappear - it appears that at least some of the errors correspond to changes in the code base that have occurred after the check out has happened.

Has someone seen this before, and if so, can you please tell me what's going on?

  Owen.
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Re: Problems with Git.

Owen Thomas-2
Hi again.

I haven't heard anything in reply to this question from the forum.

If anyone has replied to this my question, but maybe has posted their reply through the forum's web page, could you please re-post it in an email to nbusers... for some reason, the web posts don't appear in my inbox. I think this is a known problem.

  Owen.



On 8 May 2017 at 09:46, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello again.

I am seeing some issues with committing a Git code base in Netbeans.

When I commit from the root directory, I observe that some blue cylinders remain. I right-click on the root node, select Git -> Show Changes, and nothing appears. When I check out a new copy of the code base and open it in Netbeans, I get compile-time errors.

I can get rid of the errors, and in many cases, the blue cylinders also disappear - it appears that at least some of the errors correspond to changes in the code base that have occurred after the check out has happened.

Has someone seen this before, and if so, can you please tell me what's going on?

  Owen.

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Re: Problems with Git.

geertjan.wielenga@oracle.com


Best is to provide step by step instructions for someone to reproduce the problem.

I.e., put a small sample project on GitHub and then explain step by step how to reproduce the problem with that sample.

Gj


On 9-5-2017 12:47, Owen Thomas wrote:
Hi again.

I haven't heard anything in reply to this question from the forum.

If anyone has replied to this my question, but maybe has posted their reply through the forum's web page, could you please re-post it in an email to nbusers... for some reason, the web posts don't appear in my inbox. I think this is a known problem.

  Owen.



On 8 May 2017 at 09:46, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello again.

I am seeing some issues with committing a Git code base in Netbeans.

When I commit from the root directory, I observe that some blue cylinders remain. I right-click on the root node, select Git -> Show Changes, and nothing appears. When I check out a new copy of the code base and open it in Netbeans, I get compile-time errors.

I can get rid of the errors, and in many cases, the blue cylinders also disappear - it appears that at least some of the errors correspond to changes in the code base that have occurred after the check out has happened.

Has someone seen this before, and if so, can you please tell me what's going on?

  Owen.


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Re: Problems with Git.

Owen Thomas-2
I just wanted to know if anyone had seen a similar problem to the one I am reporting. As regards reproducing anything, I can't reproduce it because I don't know why it is happening in the first place.

Thanks anyway for your reply. In as much as it might explain to me that no one has experienced any similar problem, your reply is informative to me. I'll keep looking at it and I'll post something more if I actually get some type of a handle on what is going on and it indeed appears to be something more than a user error.


On 9 May 2017 at 20:51, geertjan wielenga <[hidden email]> wrote:


Best is to provide step by step instructions for someone to reproduce the problem.

I.e., put a small sample project on GitHub and then explain step by step how to reproduce the problem with that sample.

Gj


On 9-5-2017 12:47, Owen Thomas wrote:
Hi again.

I haven't heard anything in reply to this question from the forum.

If anyone has replied to this my question, but maybe has posted their reply through the forum's web page, could you please re-post it in an email to nbusers... for some reason, the web posts don't appear in my inbox. I think this is a known problem.

  Owen.



On 8 May 2017 at 09:46, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello again.

I am seeing some issues with committing a Git code base in Netbeans.

When I commit from the root directory, I observe that some blue cylinders remain. I right-click on the root node, select Git -> Show Changes, and nothing appears. When I check out a new copy of the code base and open it in Netbeans, I get compile-time errors.

I can get rid of the errors, and in many cases, the blue cylinders also disappear - it appears that at least some of the errors correspond to changes in the code base that have occurred after the check out has happened.

Has someone seen this before, and if so, can you please tell me what's going on?

  Owen.



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Re: Problems with Git.

Owen Thomas-2
Hmmm... Maybe this will help...

I'm a new user to Git (I migrated my work from Subversion), and some veterans may see my behaviour is a possible cause for what I'm seeing... get back to me and tell me why you would believe this if indeed you do...

When I commit a working copy, I compress the bare repo (.git directory) and archive it. I then close all four open projects that comprise my work and exit Netbeans.

I then delete the directory of the installed repo, recreate the directory, and copy the bare repo from the archive.

I reopen Netbeans after cleaning my cache directory (rm -rf * from ~/.cache/Netbeans/<current-version>). Once Netbeans is started, I open the Git Repository Browser, select the directory I have just recreated and copied the bare repo to, right click on this directory in the browser, select Checkout -> Checkout Files, check my four projects into the same directory as the bare repo is copied into, and re-open these four projects in Netbeans.

Generally, all projects come back into Netbeans as fresh copies of the repository head without any embellishments, but sometimes Netbeans tells me there are compile time errors.

These compilation errors only seem to appear when I notice that after I have committed my changes at the first step, Netbeans tells me that changes remain to be committed by showing blue cylinder embellishment next to the relevant projects. Netbeans tells me that there are no changes when I ask it to show me what the changes are by right-clicking on the installed repo directory from the Favourites view, and selecting Git -> Show Changes.

So, I hope that helps someone to help me...


On 9 May 2017 at 22:42, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
I just wanted to know if anyone had seen a similar problem to the one I am reporting. As regards reproducing anything, I can't reproduce it because I don't know why it is happening in the first place.

Thanks anyway for your reply. In as much as it might explain to me that no one has experienced any similar problem, your reply is informative to me. I'll keep looking at it and I'll post something more if I actually get some type of a handle on what is going on and it indeed appears to be something more than a user error.


On 9 May 2017 at 20:51, geertjan wielenga <[hidden email]> wrote:


Best is to provide step by step instructions for someone to reproduce the problem.

I.e., put a small sample project on GitHub and then explain step by step how to reproduce the problem with that sample.

Gj


On 9-5-2017 12:47, Owen Thomas wrote:
Hi again.

I haven't heard anything in reply to this question from the forum.

If anyone has replied to this my question, but maybe has posted their reply through the forum's web page, could you please re-post it in an email to nbusers... for some reason, the web posts don't appear in my inbox. I think this is a known problem.

  Owen.



On 8 May 2017 at 09:46, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello again.

I am seeing some issues with committing a Git code base in Netbeans.

When I commit from the root directory, I observe that some blue cylinders remain. I right-click on the root node, select Git -> Show Changes, and nothing appears. When I check out a new copy of the code base and open it in Netbeans, I get compile-time errors.

I can get rid of the errors, and in many cases, the blue cylinders also disappear - it appears that at least some of the errors correspond to changes in the code base that have occurred after the check out has happened.

Has someone seen this before, and if so, can you please tell me what's going on?

  Owen.




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Re: Problems with Git.

Sean Carrick-4
Owen,

It seems like you are attempting to get a copy of your repo in a weird manner...

The simplest way, with Git, is to simply use the Team...Git menu with the Clone... command. Once you click on Clone..., you will be provided the opportunity to choose your Git (or GitHub) repo, provide your login credentials and clone the repo to your local system.

Once the repo is cloned to your local system, you can then edit it as you need to do and then commit the changes. After you've committed the changes to the source, you need to Push them upstream to the Git server.

I hope this helps you out.

Sean Carrick
VP Information Systems
Integrity Solutions

On Tue, 2017-05-09 at 23:29 +1000, Owen Thomas wrote:
Hmmm... Maybe this will help...

I'm a new user to Git (I migrated my work from Subversion), and some veterans may see my behaviour is a possible cause for what I'm seeing... get back to me and tell me why you would believe this if indeed you do...

When I commit a working copy, I compress the bare repo (.git directory) and archive it. I then close all four open projects that comprise my work and exit Netbeans.

I then delete the directory of the installed repo, recreate the directory, and copy the bare repo from the archive.

I reopen Netbeans after cleaning my cache directory (rm -rf * from ~/.cache/Netbeans/<current-version>). Once Netbeans is started, I open the Git Repository Browser, select the directory I have just recreated and copied the bare repo to, right click on this directory in the browser, select Checkout -> Checkout Files, check my four projects into the same directory as the bare repo is copied into, and re-open these four projects in Netbeans.

Generally, all projects come back into Netbeans as fresh copies of the repository head without any embellishments, but sometimes Netbeans tells me there are compile time errors.

These compilation errors only seem to appear when I notice that after I have committed my changes at the first step, Netbeans tells me that changes remain to be committed by showing blue cylinder embellishment next to the relevant projects. Netbeans tells me that there are no changes when I ask it to show me what the changes are by right-clicking on the installed repo directory from the Favourites view, and selecting Git -> Show Changes.

So, I hope that helps someone to help me...


On 9 May 2017 at 22:42, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
I just wanted to know if anyone had seen a similar problem to the one I am reporting. As regards reproducing anything, I can't reproduce it because I don't know why it is happening in the first place.

Thanks anyway for your reply. In as much as it might explain to me that no one has experienced any similar problem, your reply is informative to me. I'll keep looking at it and I'll post something more if I actually get some type of a handle on what is going on and it indeed appears to be something more than a user error.


On 9 May 2017 at 20:51, geertjan wielenga <[hidden email]> wrote:


Best is to provide step by step instructions for someone to reproduce the problem.

I.e., put a small sample project on GitHub and then explain step by step how to reproduce the problem with that sample.

Gj


On 9-5-2017 12:47, Owen Thomas wrote:
Hi again.

I haven't heard anything in reply to this question from the forum.

If anyone has replied to this my question, but maybe has posted their reply through the forum's web page, could you please re-post it in an email to nbusers... for some reason, the web posts don't appear in my inbox. I think this is a known problem.

  Owen.



On 8 May 2017 at 09:46, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello again.

I am seeing some issues with committing a Git code base in Netbeans.

When I commit from the root directory, I observe that some blue cylinders remain. I right-click on the root node, select Git -> Show Changes, and nothing appears. When I check out a new copy of the code base and open it in Netbeans, I get compile-time errors.

I can get rid of the errors, and in many cases, the blue cylinders also disappear - it appears that at least some of the errors correspond to changes in the code base that have occurred after the check out has happened.

Has someone seen this before, and if so, can you please tell me what's going on?

  Owen.







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Re: Problems with Git.

Owen Thomas-2
Thanks Sean for your input.

I'm the only one using  my repo, and I don't want to copy or clone it. I do the stuff as described in an attempt to ensure that the repo was archived properly. I delete the installed repo, and recreate it every time I commit changes.

Is doing this causing Netbeans to make mistakes about what has been committed and what hasn't?


On 10 May 2017 at 02:43, Sean Carrick <[hidden email]> wrote:
Owen,

It seems like you are attempting to get a copy of your repo in a weird manner...

The simplest way, with Git, is to simply use the Team...Git menu with the Clone... command. Once you click on Clone..., you will be provided the opportunity to choose your Git (or GitHub) repo, provide your login credentials and clone the repo to your local system.

Once the repo is cloned to your local system, you can then edit it as you need to do and then commit the changes. After you've committed the changes to the source, you need to Push them upstream to the Git server.

I hope this helps you out.

Sean Carrick
VP Information Systems
Integrity Solutions

On Tue, 2017-05-09 at 23:29 +1000, Owen Thomas wrote:
Hmmm... Maybe this will help...

I'm a new user to Git (I migrated my work from Subversion), and some veterans may see my behaviour is a possible cause for what I'm seeing... get back to me and tell me why you would believe this if indeed you do...

When I commit a working copy, I compress the bare repo (.git directory) and archive it. I then close all four open projects that comprise my work and exit Netbeans.

I then delete the directory of the installed repo, recreate the directory, and copy the bare repo from the archive.

I reopen Netbeans after cleaning my cache directory (rm -rf * from ~/.cache/Netbeans/<current-version>). Once Netbeans is started, I open the Git Repository Browser, select the directory I have just recreated and copied the bare repo to, right click on this directory in the browser, select Checkout -> Checkout Files, check my four projects into the same directory as the bare repo is copied into, and re-open these four projects in Netbeans.

Generally, all projects come back into Netbeans as fresh copies of the repository head without any embellishments, but sometimes Netbeans tells me there are compile time errors.

These compilation errors only seem to appear when I notice that after I have committed my changes at the first step, Netbeans tells me that changes remain to be committed by showing blue cylinder embellishment next to the relevant projects. Netbeans tells me that there are no changes when I ask it to show me what the changes are by right-clicking on the installed repo directory from the Favourites view, and selecting Git -> Show Changes.

So, I hope that helps someone to help me...


On 9 May 2017 at 22:42, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
I just wanted to know if anyone had seen a similar problem to the one I am reporting. As regards reproducing anything, I can't reproduce it because I don't know why it is happening in the first place.

Thanks anyway for your reply. In as much as it might explain to me that no one has experienced any similar problem, your reply is informative to me. I'll keep looking at it and I'll post something more if I actually get some type of a handle on what is going on and it indeed appears to be something more than a user error.


On 9 May 2017 at 20:51, geertjan wielenga <[hidden email]> wrote:


Best is to provide step by step instructions for someone to reproduce the problem.

I.e., put a small sample project on GitHub and then explain step by step how to reproduce the problem with that sample.

Gj


On 9-5-2017 12:47, Owen Thomas wrote:
Hi again.

I haven't heard anything in reply to this question from the forum.

If anyone has replied to this my question, but maybe has posted their reply through the forum's web page, could you please re-post it in an email to nbusers... for some reason, the web posts don't appear in my inbox. I think this is a known problem.

  Owen.



On 8 May 2017 at 09:46, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello again.

I am seeing some issues with committing a Git code base in Netbeans.

When I commit from the root directory, I observe that some blue cylinders remain. I right-click on the root node, select Git -> Show Changes, and nothing appears. When I check out a new copy of the code base and open it in Netbeans, I get compile-time errors.

I can get rid of the errors, and in many cases, the blue cylinders also disappear - it appears that at least some of the errors correspond to changes in the code base that have occurred after the check out has happened.

Has someone seen this before, and if so, can you please tell me what's going on?

  Owen.








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Re: Problems with Git.

Thomas Wolf-7
Hi Owen,
I don't pretend to be an expert on git - or any other source control system for that matter - but what you're doing seems "unusual".   If you just want to make sure the repo is backed up, why don't you just tar/zip it?  I don't know git or netbeans internals, but I can imagine how the actions you're describing might throw off file time stamps and/or netbeans caches.

I am currently in a similar boat as you: my repos are just for me.  I occasionally tar/zip them to a different drive - and depend on our company's backup software for regular backups.  I have not had the problems you describe.

tom

On May 10, 2017, at 9:16 AM, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:

Thanks Sean for your input.

I'm the only one using  my repo, and I don't want to copy or clone it. I do the stuff as described in an attempt to ensure that the repo was archived properly. I delete the installed repo, and recreate it every time I commit changes.

Is doing this causing Netbeans to make mistakes about what has been committed and what hasn't?


On 10 May 2017 at 02:43, Sean Carrick <[hidden email]> wrote:
Owen,

It seems like you are attempting to get a copy of your repo in a weird manner...

The simplest way, with Git, is to simply use the Team...Git menu with the Clone... command. Once you click on Clone..., you will be provided the opportunity to choose your Git (or GitHub) repo, provide your login credentials and clone the repo to your local system.

Once the repo is cloned to your local system, you can then edit it as you need to do and then commit the changes. After you've committed the changes to the source, you need to Push them upstream to the Git server.

I hope this helps you out.

Sean Carrick
VP Information Systems
Integrity Solutions

On Tue, 2017-05-09 at 23:29 +1000, Owen Thomas wrote:
Hmmm... Maybe this will help...

I'm a new user to Git (I migrated my work from Subversion), and some veterans may see my behaviour is a possible cause for what I'm seeing... get back to me and tell me why you would believe this if indeed you do...

When I commit a working copy, I compress the bare repo (.git directory) and archive it. I then close all four open projects that comprise my work and exit Netbeans.

I then delete the directory of the installed repo, recreate the directory, and copy the bare repo from the archive.

I reopen Netbeans after cleaning my cache directory (rm -rf * from ~/.cache/Netbeans/<current-version>). Once Netbeans is started, I open the Git Repository Browser, select the directory I have just recreated and copied the bare repo to, right click on this directory in the browser, select Checkout -> Checkout Files, check my four projects into the same directory as the bare repo is copied into, and re-open these four projects in Netbeans.

Generally, all projects come back into Netbeans as fresh copies of the repository head without any embellishments, but sometimes Netbeans tells me there are compile time errors.

These compilation errors only seem to appear when I notice that after I have committed my changes at the first step, Netbeans tells me that changes remain to be committed by showing blue cylinder embellishment next to the relevant projects. Netbeans tells me that there are no changes when I ask it to show me what the changes are by right-clicking on the installed repo directory from the Favourites view, and selecting Git -> Show Changes.

So, I hope that helps someone to help me...


On 9 May 2017 at 22:42, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
I just wanted to know if anyone had seen a similar problem to the one I am reporting. As regards reproducing anything, I can't reproduce it because I don't know why it is happening in the first place.

Thanks anyway for your reply. In as much as it might explain to me that no one has experienced any similar problem, your reply is informative to me. I'll keep looking at it and I'll post something more if I actually get some type of a handle on what is going on and it indeed appears to be something more than a user error.


On 9 May 2017 at 20:51, geertjan wielenga <[hidden email]> wrote:


Best is to provide step by step instructions for someone to reproduce the problem.

I.e., put a small sample project on GitHub and then explain step by step how to reproduce the problem with that sample.

Gj


On 9-5-2017 12:47, Owen Thomas wrote:
Hi again.

I haven't heard anything in reply to this question from the forum.

If anyone has replied to this my question, but maybe has posted their reply through the forum's web page, could you please re-post it in an email to nbusers... for some reason, the web posts don't appear in my inbox. I think this is a known problem.

  Owen.



On 8 May 2017 at 09:46, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello again.

I am seeing some issues with committing a Git code base in Netbeans.

When I commit from the root directory, I observe that some blue cylinders remain. I right-click on the root node, select Git -> Show Changes, and nothing appears. When I check out a new copy of the code base and open it in Netbeans, I get compile-time errors.

I can get rid of the errors, and in many cases, the blue cylinders also disappear - it appears that at least some of the errors correspond to changes in the code base that have occurred after the check out has happened.

Has someone seen this before, and if so, can you please tell me what's going on?

  Owen.








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Re: Problems with Git.

Owen Thomas-2
Expert or no, thanks Tom for offering me some clues.

I do archive the repo as you suggest. I suppose I could be clearer still in what I do: after I archive the repo following the commit, I delete the installed repo and reinstall from the archive. Hence, I test the integrity of the archive every time I create one, ensuring that every archive has been archived correctly. I'm doing my thing by myself and hence don't use a company's backup system, nor incidentally, do I use GitHub.

I'm pretty sure now that Netbeans is caching information somewhere other than /.cache/netbeans/<current-version>. I suppose therefore that all I may have to do is clean this other cache too. If you or anyone else could point me to this cache, I think I may have the problem fixed.


On 10 May 2017 at 12:24, Thomas Wolf <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Owen,
I don't pretend to be an expert on git - or any other source control system for that matter - but what you're doing seems "unusual".   If you just want to make sure the repo is backed up, why don't you just tar/zip it?  I don't know git or netbeans internals, but I can imagine how the actions you're describing might throw off file time stamps and/or netbeans caches.

I am currently in a similar boat as you: my repos are just for me.  I occasionally tar/zip them to a different drive - and depend on our company's backup software for regular backups.  I have not had the problems you describe.

tom

On May 10, 2017, at 9:16 AM, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:

Thanks Sean for your input.

I'm the only one using  my repo, and I don't want to copy or clone it. I do the stuff as described in an attempt to ensure that the repo was archived properly. I delete the installed repo, and recreate it every time I commit changes.

Is doing this causing Netbeans to make mistakes about what has been committed and what hasn't?


On 10 May 2017 at 02:43, Sean Carrick <[hidden email]> wrote:
Owen,

It seems like you are attempting to get a copy of your repo in a weird manner...

The simplest way, with Git, is to simply use the Team...Git menu with the Clone... command. Once you click on Clone..., you will be provided the opportunity to choose your Git (or GitHub) repo, provide your login credentials and clone the repo to your local system.

Once the repo is cloned to your local system, you can then edit it as you need to do and then commit the changes. After you've committed the changes to the source, you need to Push them upstream to the Git server.

I hope this helps you out.

Sean Carrick
VP Information Systems
Integrity Solutions

On Tue, 2017-05-09 at 23:29 +1000, Owen Thomas wrote:
Hmmm... Maybe this will help...

I'm a new user to Git (I migrated my work from Subversion), and some veterans may see my behaviour is a possible cause for what I'm seeing... get back to me and tell me why you would believe this if indeed you do...

When I commit a working copy, I compress the bare repo (.git directory) and archive it. I then close all four open projects that comprise my work and exit Netbeans.

I then delete the directory of the installed repo, recreate the directory, and copy the bare repo from the archive.

I reopen Netbeans after cleaning my cache directory (rm -rf * from ~/.cache/Netbeans/<current-version>). Once Netbeans is started, I open the Git Repository Browser, select the directory I have just recreated and copied the bare repo to, right click on this directory in the browser, select Checkout -> Checkout Files, check my four projects into the same directory as the bare repo is copied into, and re-open these four projects in Netbeans.

Generally, all projects come back into Netbeans as fresh copies of the repository head without any embellishments, but sometimes Netbeans tells me there are compile time errors.

These compilation errors only seem to appear when I notice that after I have committed my changes at the first step, Netbeans tells me that changes remain to be committed by showing blue cylinder embellishment next to the relevant projects. Netbeans tells me that there are no changes when I ask it to show me what the changes are by right-clicking on the installed repo directory from the Favourites view, and selecting Git -> Show Changes.

So, I hope that helps someone to help me...


On 9 May 2017 at 22:42, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
I just wanted to know if anyone had seen a similar problem to the one I am reporting. As regards reproducing anything, I can't reproduce it because I don't know why it is happening in the first place.

Thanks anyway for your reply. In as much as it might explain to me that no one has experienced any similar problem, your reply is informative to me. I'll keep looking at it and I'll post something more if I actually get some type of a handle on what is going on and it indeed appears to be something more than a user error.


On 9 May 2017 at 20:51, geertjan wielenga <[hidden email]> wrote:


Best is to provide step by step instructions for someone to reproduce the problem.

I.e., put a small sample project on GitHub and then explain step by step how to reproduce the problem with that sample.

Gj


On 9-5-2017 12:47, Owen Thomas wrote:
Hi again.

I haven't heard anything in reply to this question from the forum.

If anyone has replied to this my question, but maybe has posted their reply through the forum's web page, could you please re-post it in an email to nbusers... for some reason, the web posts don't appear in my inbox. I think this is a known problem.

  Owen.



On 8 May 2017 at 09:46, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello again.

I am seeing some issues with committing a Git code base in Netbeans.

When I commit from the root directory, I observe that some blue cylinders remain. I right-click on the root node, select Git -> Show Changes, and nothing appears. When I check out a new copy of the code base and open it in Netbeans, I get compile-time errors.

I can get rid of the errors, and in many cases, the blue cylinders also disappear - it appears that at least some of the errors correspond to changes in the code base that have occurred after the check out has happened.

Has someone seen this before, and if so, can you please tell me what's going on?

  Owen.









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Re: Problems with Git.

Thomas Wolf-7
Perhaps every time you re-install from archive (or when the directory was archived?) some file time stamp(s) no longer have the correct value(s).   Other than the NB caching something, that's the only guess I have to contribute - good luck.

tom

On May 10, 2017, at 11:50 AM, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:

Expert or no, thanks Tom for offering me some clues.

I do archive the repo as you suggest. I suppose I could be clearer still in what I do: after I archive the repo following the commit, I delete the installed repo and reinstall from the archive. Hence, I test the integrity of the archive every time I create one, ensuring that every archive has been archived correctly. I'm doing my thing by myself and hence don't use a company's backup system, nor incidentally, do I use GitHub.

I'm pretty sure now that Netbeans is caching information somewhere other than /.cache/netbeans/<current-version>. I suppose therefore that all I may have to do is clean this other cache too. If you or anyone else could point me to this cache, I think I may have the problem fixed.


On 10 May 2017 at 12:24, Thomas Wolf <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Owen,
I don't pretend to be an expert on git - or any other source control system for that matter - but what you're doing seems "unusual".   If you just want to make sure the repo is backed up, why don't you just tar/zip it?  I don't know git or netbeans internals, but I can imagine how the actions you're describing might throw off file time stamps and/or netbeans caches.

I am currently in a similar boat as you: my repos are just for me.  I occasionally tar/zip them to a different drive - and depend on our company's backup software for regular backups.  I have not had the problems you describe.

tom

On May 10, 2017, at 9:16 AM, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:

Thanks Sean for your input.

I'm the only one using  my repo, and I don't want to copy or clone it. I do the stuff as described in an attempt to ensure that the repo was archived properly. I delete the installed repo, and recreate it every time I commit changes.

Is doing this causing Netbeans to make mistakes about what has been committed and what hasn't?


On 10 May 2017 at 02:43, Sean Carrick <[hidden email]> wrote:
Owen,

It seems like you are attempting to get a copy of your repo in a weird manner...

The simplest way, with Git, is to simply use the Team...Git menu with the Clone... command. Once you click on Clone..., you will be provided the opportunity to choose your Git (or GitHub) repo, provide your login credentials and clone the repo to your local system.

Once the repo is cloned to your local system, you can then edit it as you need to do and then commit the changes. After you've committed the changes to the source, you need to Push them upstream to the Git server.

I hope this helps you out.

Sean Carrick
VP Information Systems
Integrity Solutions

On Tue, 2017-05-09 at 23:29 +1000, Owen Thomas wrote:
Hmmm... Maybe this will help...

I'm a new user to Git (I migrated my work from Subversion), and some veterans may see my behaviour is a possible cause for what I'm seeing... get back to me and tell me why you would believe this if indeed you do...

When I commit a working copy, I compress the bare repo (.git directory) and archive it. I then close all four open projects that comprise my work and exit Netbeans.

I then delete the directory of the installed repo, recreate the directory, and copy the bare repo from the archive.

I reopen Netbeans after cleaning my cache directory (rm -rf * from ~/.cache/Netbeans/<current-version>). Once Netbeans is started, I open the Git Repository Browser, select the directory I have just recreated and copied the bare repo to, right click on this directory in the browser, select Checkout -> Checkout Files, check my four projects into the same directory as the bare repo is copied into, and re-open these four projects in Netbeans.

Generally, all projects come back into Netbeans as fresh copies of the repository head without any embellishments, but sometimes Netbeans tells me there are compile time errors.

These compilation errors only seem to appear when I notice that after I have committed my changes at the first step, Netbeans tells me that changes remain to be committed by showing blue cylinder embellishment next to the relevant projects. Netbeans tells me that there are no changes when I ask it to show me what the changes are by right-clicking on the installed repo directory from the Favourites view, and selecting Git -> Show Changes.

So, I hope that helps someone to help me...


On 9 May 2017 at 22:42, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
I just wanted to know if anyone had seen a similar problem to the one I am reporting. As regards reproducing anything, I can't reproduce it because I don't know why it is happening in the first place.

Thanks anyway for your reply. In as much as it might explain to me that no one has experienced any similar problem, your reply is informative to me. I'll keep looking at it and I'll post something more if I actually get some type of a handle on what is going on and it indeed appears to be something more than a user error.


On 9 May 2017 at 20:51, geertjan wielenga <[hidden email]> wrote:


Best is to provide step by step instructions for someone to reproduce the problem.

I.e., put a small sample project on GitHub and then explain step by step how to reproduce the problem with that sample.

Gj


On 9-5-2017 12:47, Owen Thomas wrote:
Hi again.

I haven't heard anything in reply to this question from the forum.

If anyone has replied to this my question, but maybe has posted their reply through the forum's web page, could you please re-post it in an email to nbusers... for some reason, the web posts don't appear in my inbox. I think this is a known problem.

  Owen.



On 8 May 2017 at 09:46, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello again.

I am seeing some issues with committing a Git code base in Netbeans.

When I commit from the root directory, I observe that some blue cylinders remain. I right-click on the root node, select Git -> Show Changes, and nothing appears. When I check out a new copy of the code base and open it in Netbeans, I get compile-time errors.

I can get rid of the errors, and in many cases, the blue cylinders also disappear - it appears that at least some of the errors correspond to changes in the code base that have occurred after the check out has happened.

Has someone seen this before, and if so, can you please tell me what's going on?

  Owen.









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Re: Problems with Git.

Owen Thomas-2
Well, I suppose I've done my best to let others know of my difficulties. Thanks for the help - I may yet find out what is causing this and I'll put something up about what I found.

On 10 May 2017 at 16:54, Thomas Wolf <[hidden email]> wrote:
Perhaps every time you re-install from archive (or when the directory was archived?) some file time stamp(s) no longer have the correct value(s).   Other than the NB caching something, that's the only guess I have to contribute - good luck.

tom

On May 10, 2017, at 11:50 AM, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:

Expert or no, thanks Tom for offering me some clues.

I do archive the repo as you suggest. I suppose I could be clearer still in what I do: after I archive the repo following the commit, I delete the installed repo and reinstall from the archive. Hence, I test the integrity of the archive every time I create one, ensuring that every archive has been archived correctly. I'm doing my thing by myself and hence don't use a company's backup system, nor incidentally, do I use GitHub.

I'm pretty sure now that Netbeans is caching information somewhere other than /.cache/netbeans/<current-version>. I suppose therefore that all I may have to do is clean this other cache too. If you or anyone else could point me to this cache, I think I may have the problem fixed.


On 10 May 2017 at 12:24, Thomas Wolf <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Owen,
I don't pretend to be an expert on git - or any other source control system for that matter - but what you're doing seems "unusual".   If you just want to make sure the repo is backed up, why don't you just tar/zip it?  I don't know git or netbeans internals, but I can imagine how the actions you're describing might throw off file time stamps and/or netbeans caches.

I am currently in a similar boat as you: my repos are just for me.  I occasionally tar/zip them to a different drive - and depend on our company's backup software for regular backups.  I have not had the problems you describe.

tom

On May 10, 2017, at 9:16 AM, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:

Thanks Sean for your input.

I'm the only one using  my repo, and I don't want to copy or clone it. I do the stuff as described in an attempt to ensure that the repo was archived properly. I delete the installed repo, and recreate it every time I commit changes.

Is doing this causing Netbeans to make mistakes about what has been committed and what hasn't?


On 10 May 2017 at 02:43, Sean Carrick <[hidden email]> wrote:
Owen,

It seems like you are attempting to get a copy of your repo in a weird manner...

The simplest way, with Git, is to simply use the Team...Git menu with the Clone... command. Once you click on Clone..., you will be provided the opportunity to choose your Git (or GitHub) repo, provide your login credentials and clone the repo to your local system.

Once the repo is cloned to your local system, you can then edit it as you need to do and then commit the changes. After you've committed the changes to the source, you need to Push them upstream to the Git server.

I hope this helps you out.

Sean Carrick
VP Information Systems
Integrity Solutions

On Tue, 2017-05-09 at 23:29 +1000, Owen Thomas wrote:
Hmmm... Maybe this will help...

I'm a new user to Git (I migrated my work from Subversion), and some veterans may see my behaviour is a possible cause for what I'm seeing... get back to me and tell me why you would believe this if indeed you do...

When I commit a working copy, I compress the bare repo (.git directory) and archive it. I then close all four open projects that comprise my work and exit Netbeans.

I then delete the directory of the installed repo, recreate the directory, and copy the bare repo from the archive.

I reopen Netbeans after cleaning my cache directory (rm -rf * from ~/.cache/Netbeans/<current-version>). Once Netbeans is started, I open the Git Repository Browser, select the directory I have just recreated and copied the bare repo to, right click on this directory in the browser, select Checkout -> Checkout Files, check my four projects into the same directory as the bare repo is copied into, and re-open these four projects in Netbeans.

Generally, all projects come back into Netbeans as fresh copies of the repository head without any embellishments, but sometimes Netbeans tells me there are compile time errors.

These compilation errors only seem to appear when I notice that after I have committed my changes at the first step, Netbeans tells me that changes remain to be committed by showing blue cylinder embellishment next to the relevant projects. Netbeans tells me that there are no changes when I ask it to show me what the changes are by right-clicking on the installed repo directory from the Favourites view, and selecting Git -> Show Changes.

So, I hope that helps someone to help me...


On 9 May 2017 at 22:42, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
I just wanted to know if anyone had seen a similar problem to the one I am reporting. As regards reproducing anything, I can't reproduce it because I don't know why it is happening in the first place.

Thanks anyway for your reply. In as much as it might explain to me that no one has experienced any similar problem, your reply is informative to me. I'll keep looking at it and I'll post something more if I actually get some type of a handle on what is going on and it indeed appears to be something more than a user error.


On 9 May 2017 at 20:51, geertjan wielenga <[hidden email]> wrote:


Best is to provide step by step instructions for someone to reproduce the problem.

I.e., put a small sample project on GitHub and then explain step by step how to reproduce the problem with that sample.

Gj


On 9-5-2017 12:47, Owen Thomas wrote:
Hi again.

I haven't heard anything in reply to this question from the forum.

If anyone has replied to this my question, but maybe has posted their reply through the forum's web page, could you please re-post it in an email to nbusers... for some reason, the web posts don't appear in my inbox. I think this is a known problem.

  Owen.



On 8 May 2017 at 09:46, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello again.

I am seeing some issues with committing a Git code base in Netbeans.

When I commit from the root directory, I observe that some blue cylinders remain. I right-click on the root node, select Git -> Show Changes, and nothing appears. When I check out a new copy of the code base and open it in Netbeans, I get compile-time errors.

I can get rid of the errors, and in many cases, the blue cylinders also disappear - it appears that at least some of the errors correspond to changes in the code base that have occurred after the check out has happened.

Has someone seen this before, and if so, can you please tell me what's going on?

  Owen.










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|

Re: Problems with Git.

Simon Roberts
So, how are you creating your archive? Are you reliably maintaining permissions and timestamps (timestamps being more important)? Are you using rsync in "archive" mode, for example, or are you using a recursive copy, or perhaps using tar in a non-archive mode?

Does the command line version of the git tooling work as expected? That would tell pretty clearly if your archive is somehow incompatible with git or whether there's an actual problem with NetBeans. 

(And sorry if that info is somewhere in this thread, I only just came across it, and therefore could have missed something in scanning the history).

Cheers,
Simon

On Wed, May 10, 2017 at 11:23 AM, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
Well, I suppose I've done my best to let others know of my difficulties. Thanks for the help - I may yet find out what is causing this and I'll put something up about what I found.

On 10 May 2017 at 16:54, Thomas Wolf <[hidden email]> wrote:
Perhaps every time you re-install from archive (or when the directory was archived?) some file time stamp(s) no longer have the correct value(s).   Other than the NB caching something, that's the only guess I have to contribute - good luck.

tom

On May 10, 2017, at 11:50 AM, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:

Expert or no, thanks Tom for offering me some clues.

I do archive the repo as you suggest. I suppose I could be clearer still in what I do: after I archive the repo following the commit, I delete the installed repo and reinstall from the archive. Hence, I test the integrity of the archive every time I create one, ensuring that every archive has been archived correctly. I'm doing my thing by myself and hence don't use a company's backup system, nor incidentally, do I use GitHub.

I'm pretty sure now that Netbeans is caching information somewhere other than /.cache/netbeans/<current-version>. I suppose therefore that all I may have to do is clean this other cache too. If you or anyone else could point me to this cache, I think I may have the problem fixed.


On 10 May 2017 at 12:24, Thomas Wolf <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Owen,
I don't pretend to be an expert on git - or any other source control system for that matter - but what you're doing seems "unusual".   If you just want to make sure the repo is backed up, why don't you just tar/zip it?  I don't know git or netbeans internals, but I can imagine how the actions you're describing might throw off file time stamps and/or netbeans caches.

I am currently in a similar boat as you: my repos are just for me.  I occasionally tar/zip them to a different drive - and depend on our company's backup software for regular backups.  I have not had the problems you describe.

tom

On May 10, 2017, at 9:16 AM, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:

Thanks Sean for your input.

I'm the only one using  my repo, and I don't want to copy or clone it. I do the stuff as described in an attempt to ensure that the repo was archived properly. I delete the installed repo, and recreate it every time I commit changes.

Is doing this causing Netbeans to make mistakes about what has been committed and what hasn't?


On 10 May 2017 at 02:43, Sean Carrick <[hidden email]> wrote:
Owen,

It seems like you are attempting to get a copy of your repo in a weird manner...

The simplest way, with Git, is to simply use the Team...Git menu with the Clone... command. Once you click on Clone..., you will be provided the opportunity to choose your Git (or GitHub) repo, provide your login credentials and clone the repo to your local system.

Once the repo is cloned to your local system, you can then edit it as you need to do and then commit the changes. After you've committed the changes to the source, you need to Push them upstream to the Git server.

I hope this helps you out.

Sean Carrick
VP Information Systems
Integrity Solutions

On Tue, 2017-05-09 at 23:29 +1000, Owen Thomas wrote:
Hmmm... Maybe this will help...

I'm a new user to Git (I migrated my work from Subversion), and some veterans may see my behaviour is a possible cause for what I'm seeing... get back to me and tell me why you would believe this if indeed you do...

When I commit a working copy, I compress the bare repo (.git directory) and archive it. I then close all four open projects that comprise my work and exit Netbeans.

I then delete the directory of the installed repo, recreate the directory, and copy the bare repo from the archive.

I reopen Netbeans after cleaning my cache directory (rm -rf * from ~/.cache/Netbeans/<current-version>). Once Netbeans is started, I open the Git Repository Browser, select the directory I have just recreated and copied the bare repo to, right click on this directory in the browser, select Checkout -> Checkout Files, check my four projects into the same directory as the bare repo is copied into, and re-open these four projects in Netbeans.

Generally, all projects come back into Netbeans as fresh copies of the repository head without any embellishments, but sometimes Netbeans tells me there are compile time errors.

These compilation errors only seem to appear when I notice that after I have committed my changes at the first step, Netbeans tells me that changes remain to be committed by showing blue cylinder embellishment next to the relevant projects. Netbeans tells me that there are no changes when I ask it to show me what the changes are by right-clicking on the installed repo directory from the Favourites view, and selecting Git -> Show Changes.

So, I hope that helps someone to help me...


On 9 May 2017 at 22:42, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
I just wanted to know if anyone had seen a similar problem to the one I am reporting. As regards reproducing anything, I can't reproduce it because I don't know why it is happening in the first place.

Thanks anyway for your reply. In as much as it might explain to me that no one has experienced any similar problem, your reply is informative to me. I'll keep looking at it and I'll post something more if I actually get some type of a handle on what is going on and it indeed appears to be something more than a user error.


On 9 May 2017 at 20:51, geertjan wielenga <[hidden email]> wrote:


Best is to provide step by step instructions for someone to reproduce the problem.

I.e., put a small sample project on GitHub and then explain step by step how to reproduce the problem with that sample.

Gj


On 9-5-2017 12:47, Owen Thomas wrote:
Hi again.

I haven't heard anything in reply to this question from the forum.

If anyone has replied to this my question, but maybe has posted their reply through the forum's web page, could you please re-post it in an email to nbusers... for some reason, the web posts don't appear in my inbox. I think this is a known problem.

  Owen.



On 8 May 2017 at 09:46, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello again.

I am seeing some issues with committing a Git code base in Netbeans.

When I commit from the root directory, I observe that some blue cylinders remain. I right-click on the root node, select Git -> Show Changes, and nothing appears. When I check out a new copy of the code base and open it in Netbeans, I get compile-time errors.

I can get rid of the errors, and in many cases, the blue cylinders also disappear - it appears that at least some of the errors correspond to changes in the code base that have occurred after the check out has happened.

Has someone seen this before, and if so, can you please tell me what's going on?

  Owen.













--
Simon Roberts
http://dancingcloudphotography.com
(303) 249 3613
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Re: Problems with Git.

geertjan.wielenga@oracle.com
In reply to this post by Owen Thomas-2



On 10-5-2017 5:50, Owen Thomas wrote:
Expert or no, thanks Tom for offering me some clues.

I do archive the repo as you suggest. I suppose I could be clearer still in what I do: after I archive the repo following the commit, I delete the installed repo and reinstall from the archive. Hence, I test the integrity of the archive every time I create one, ensuring that every archive has been archived correctly. I'm doing my thing by myself and hence don't use a company's backup system, nor incidentally, do I use GitHub.

I'm pretty sure now that Netbeans is caching information somewhere other than /.cache/netbeans/<current-version>. I suppose therefore that all I may have to do is clean this other cache too. If you or anyone else could point me to this cache, I think I may have the problem fixed.


http://wiki.netbeans.org/FaqWhatIsUserdir

Gj




On 10 May 2017 at 12:24, Thomas Wolf <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Owen,
I don't pretend to be an expert on git - or any other source control system for that matter - but what you're doing seems "unusual".   If you just want to make sure the repo is backed up, why don't you just tar/zip it?  I don't know git or netbeans internals, but I can imagine how the actions you're describing might throw off file time stamps and/or netbeans caches.

I am currently in a similar boat as you: my repos are just for me.  I occasionally tar/zip them to a different drive - and depend on our company's backup software for regular backups.  I have not had the problems you describe.

tom

On May 10, 2017, at 9:16 AM, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:

Thanks Sean for your input.

I'm the only one using  my repo, and I don't want to copy or clone it. I do the stuff as described in an attempt to ensure that the repo was archived properly. I delete the installed repo, and recreate it every time I commit changes.

Is doing this causing Netbeans to make mistakes about what has been committed and what hasn't?


On 10 May 2017 at 02:43, Sean Carrick <[hidden email]> wrote:
Owen,

It seems like you are attempting to get a copy of your repo in a weird manner...

The simplest way, with Git, is to simply use the Team...Git menu with the Clone... command. Once you click on Clone..., you will be provided the opportunity to choose your Git (or GitHub) repo, provide your login credentials and clone the repo to your local system.

Once the repo is cloned to your local system, you can then edit it as you need to do and then commit the changes. After you've committed the changes to the source, you need to Push them upstream to the Git server.

I hope this helps you out.

Sean Carrick
VP Information Systems
Integrity Solutions

On Tue, 2017-05-09 at 23:29 +1000, Owen Thomas wrote:
Hmmm... Maybe this will help...

I'm a new user to Git (I migrated my work from Subversion), and some veterans may see my behaviour is a possible cause for what I'm seeing... get back to me and tell me why you would believe this if indeed you do...

When I commit a working copy, I compress the bare repo (.git directory) and archive it. I then close all four open projects that comprise my work and exit Netbeans.

I then delete the directory of the installed repo, recreate the directory, and copy the bare repo from the archive.

I reopen Netbeans after cleaning my cache directory (rm -rf * from ~/.cache/Netbeans/<current-version>). Once Netbeans is started, I open the Git Repository Browser, select the directory I have just recreated and copied the bare repo to, right click on this directory in the browser, select Checkout -> Checkout Files, check my four projects into the same directory as the bare repo is copied into, and re-open these four projects in Netbeans.

Generally, all projects come back into Netbeans as fresh copies of the repository head without any embellishments, but sometimes Netbeans tells me there are compile time errors.

These compilation errors only seem to appear when I notice that after I have committed my changes at the first step, Netbeans tells me that changes remain to be committed by showing blue cylinder embellishment next to the relevant projects. Netbeans tells me that there are no changes when I ask it to show me what the changes are by right-clicking on the installed repo directory from the Favourites view, and selecting Git -> Show Changes.

So, I hope that helps someone to help me...


On 9 May 2017 at 22:42, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
I just wanted to know if anyone had seen a similar problem to the one I am reporting. As regards reproducing anything, I can't reproduce it because I don't know why it is happening in the first place.

Thanks anyway for your reply. In as much as it might explain to me that no one has experienced any similar problem, your reply is informative to me. I'll keep looking at it and I'll post something more if I actually get some type of a handle on what is going on and it indeed appears to be something more than a user error.


On 9 May 2017 at 20:51, geertjan wielenga <[hidden email]> wrote:


Best is to provide step by step instructions for someone to reproduce the problem.

I.e., put a small sample project on GitHub and then explain step by step how to reproduce the problem with that sample.

Gj


On 9-5-2017 12:47, Owen Thomas wrote:
Hi again.

I haven't heard anything in reply to this question from the forum.

If anyone has replied to this my question, but maybe has posted their reply through the forum's web page, could you please re-post it in an email to nbusers... for some reason, the web posts don't appear in my inbox. I think this is a known problem.

  Owen.



On 8 May 2017 at 09:46, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello again.

I am seeing some issues with committing a Git code base in Netbeans.

When I commit from the root directory, I observe that some blue cylinders remain. I right-click on the root node, select Git -> Show Changes, and nothing appears. When I check out a new copy of the code base and open it in Netbeans, I get compile-time errors.

I can get rid of the errors, and in many cases, the blue cylinders also disappear - it appears that at least some of the errors correspond to changes in the code base that have occurred after the check out has happened.

Has someone seen this before, and if so, can you please tell me what's going on?

  Owen.










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|

Re: Problems with Git.

Owen Thomas-2
In reply to this post by Simon Roberts
I'm creating my archive simply by compressing the .git file into a file like 2017-05-11, then storing the file in a directory on a removal medium - a memory stick in my case. Not very complicated.

Would doing anything else really be necessary?

On 10 May 2017 at 21:19, Simon Roberts <[hidden email]> wrote:
So, how are you creating your archive? Are you reliably maintaining permissions and timestamps (timestamps being more important)? Are you using rsync in "archive" mode, for example, or are you using a recursive copy, or perhaps using tar in a non-archive mode?

Does the command line version of the git tooling work as expected? That would tell pretty clearly if your archive is somehow incompatible with git or whether there's an actual problem with NetBeans. 

(And sorry if that info is somewhere in this thread, I only just came across it, and therefore could have missed something in scanning the history).

Cheers,
Simon

On Wed, May 10, 2017 at 11:23 AM, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
Well, I suppose I've done my best to let others know of my difficulties. Thanks for the help - I may yet find out what is causing this and I'll put something up about what I found.

On 10 May 2017 at 16:54, Thomas Wolf <[hidden email]> wrote:
Perhaps every time you re-install from archive (or when the directory was archived?) some file time stamp(s) no longer have the correct value(s).   Other than the NB caching something, that's the only guess I have to contribute - good luck.

tom

On May 10, 2017, at 11:50 AM, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:

Expert or no, thanks Tom for offering me some clues.

I do archive the repo as you suggest. I suppose I could be clearer still in what I do: after I archive the repo following the commit, I delete the installed repo and reinstall from the archive. Hence, I test the integrity of the archive every time I create one, ensuring that every archive has been archived correctly. I'm doing my thing by myself and hence don't use a company's backup system, nor incidentally, do I use GitHub.

I'm pretty sure now that Netbeans is caching information somewhere other than /.cache/netbeans/<current-version>. I suppose therefore that all I may have to do is clean this other cache too. If you or anyone else could point me to this cache, I think I may have the problem fixed.


On 10 May 2017 at 12:24, Thomas Wolf <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Owen,
I don't pretend to be an expert on git - or any other source control system for that matter - but what you're doing seems "unusual".   If you just want to make sure the repo is backed up, why don't you just tar/zip it?  I don't know git or netbeans internals, but I can imagine how the actions you're describing might throw off file time stamps and/or netbeans caches.

I am currently in a similar boat as you: my repos are just for me.  I occasionally tar/zip them to a different drive - and depend on our company's backup software for regular backups.  I have not had the problems you describe.

tom

On May 10, 2017, at 9:16 AM, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:

Thanks Sean for your input.

I'm the only one using  my repo, and I don't want to copy or clone it. I do the stuff as described in an attempt to ensure that the repo was archived properly. I delete the installed repo, and recreate it every time I commit changes.

Is doing this causing Netbeans to make mistakes about what has been committed and what hasn't?


On 10 May 2017 at 02:43, Sean Carrick <[hidden email]> wrote:
Owen,

It seems like you are attempting to get a copy of your repo in a weird manner...

The simplest way, with Git, is to simply use the Team...Git menu with the Clone... command. Once you click on Clone..., you will be provided the opportunity to choose your Git (or GitHub) repo, provide your login credentials and clone the repo to your local system.

Once the repo is cloned to your local system, you can then edit it as you need to do and then commit the changes. After you've committed the changes to the source, you need to Push them upstream to the Git server.

I hope this helps you out.

Sean Carrick
VP Information Systems
Integrity Solutions

On Tue, 2017-05-09 at 23:29 +1000, Owen Thomas wrote:
Hmmm... Maybe this will help...

I'm a new user to Git (I migrated my work from Subversion), and some veterans may see my behaviour is a possible cause for what I'm seeing... get back to me and tell me why you would believe this if indeed you do...

When I commit a working copy, I compress the bare repo (.git directory) and archive it. I then close all four open projects that comprise my work and exit Netbeans.

I then delete the directory of the installed repo, recreate the directory, and copy the bare repo from the archive.

I reopen Netbeans after cleaning my cache directory (rm -rf * from ~/.cache/Netbeans/<current-version>). Once Netbeans is started, I open the Git Repository Browser, select the directory I have just recreated and copied the bare repo to, right click on this directory in the browser, select Checkout -> Checkout Files, check my four projects into the same directory as the bare repo is copied into, and re-open these four projects in Netbeans.

Generally, all projects come back into Netbeans as fresh copies of the repository head without any embellishments, but sometimes Netbeans tells me there are compile time errors.

These compilation errors only seem to appear when I notice that after I have committed my changes at the first step, Netbeans tells me that changes remain to be committed by showing blue cylinder embellishment next to the relevant projects. Netbeans tells me that there are no changes when I ask it to show me what the changes are by right-clicking on the installed repo directory from the Favourites view, and selecting Git -> Show Changes.

So, I hope that helps someone to help me...


On 9 May 2017 at 22:42, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
I just wanted to know if anyone had seen a similar problem to the one I am reporting. As regards reproducing anything, I can't reproduce it because I don't know why it is happening in the first place.

Thanks anyway for your reply. In as much as it might explain to me that no one has experienced any similar problem, your reply is informative to me. I'll keep looking at it and I'll post something more if I actually get some type of a handle on what is going on and it indeed appears to be something more than a user error.


On 9 May 2017 at 20:51, geertjan wielenga <[hidden email]> wrote:


Best is to provide step by step instructions for someone to reproduce the problem.

I.e., put a small sample project on GitHub and then explain step by step how to reproduce the problem with that sample.

Gj


On 9-5-2017 12:47, Owen Thomas wrote:
Hi again.

I haven't heard anything in reply to this question from the forum.

If anyone has replied to this my question, but maybe has posted their reply through the forum's web page, could you please re-post it in an email to nbusers... for some reason, the web posts don't appear in my inbox. I think this is a known problem.

  Owen.



On 8 May 2017 at 09:46, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello again.

I am seeing some issues with committing a Git code base in Netbeans.

When I commit from the root directory, I observe that some blue cylinders remain. I right-click on the root node, select Git -> Show Changes, and nothing appears. When I check out a new copy of the code base and open it in Netbeans, I get compile-time errors.

I can get rid of the errors, and in many cases, the blue cylinders also disappear - it appears that at least some of the errors correspond to changes in the code base that have occurred after the check out has happened.

Has someone seen this before, and if so, can you please tell me what's going on?

  Owen.













--
Simon Roberts
http://dancingcloudphotography.com
(303) 249 3613

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Re: Problems with Git.

Simon Roberts
Well, yes, quite possibly. Depending on the tool you use, and the arguments you give, the date and time stamps can be reset to "now" when you expand the archive. While your tools might get this "right" by default, some need specific instruction. Anyway, it's simple enough to check--just look at the timestamps on your newly expanded stuff.

But other than that, I still suggest you try command line git, if it too is confused, then you have a problem with your archive, if it's not, then you have a problem with netbeans. First step to debugging is always to find out where to look for the problem ;)

HTH

On Thu, May 11, 2017 at 12:14 AM, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
I'm creating my archive simply by compressing the .git file into a file like 2017-05-11, then storing the file in a directory on a removal medium - a memory stick in my case. Not very complicated.

Would doing anything else really be necessary?

On 10 May 2017 at 21:19, Simon Roberts <[hidden email]> wrote:
So, how are you creating your archive? Are you reliably maintaining permissions and timestamps (timestamps being more important)? Are you using rsync in "archive" mode, for example, or are you using a recursive copy, or perhaps using tar in a non-archive mode?

Does the command line version of the git tooling work as expected? That would tell pretty clearly if your archive is somehow incompatible with git or whether there's an actual problem with NetBeans. 

(And sorry if that info is somewhere in this thread, I only just came across it, and therefore could have missed something in scanning the history).

Cheers,
Simon

On Wed, May 10, 2017 at 11:23 AM, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
Well, I suppose I've done my best to let others know of my difficulties. Thanks for the help - I may yet find out what is causing this and I'll put something up about what I found.

On 10 May 2017 at 16:54, Thomas Wolf <[hidden email]> wrote:
Perhaps every time you re-install from archive (or when the directory was archived?) some file time stamp(s) no longer have the correct value(s).   Other than the NB caching something, that's the only guess I have to contribute - good luck.

tom

On May 10, 2017, at 11:50 AM, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:

Expert or no, thanks Tom for offering me some clues.

I do archive the repo as you suggest. I suppose I could be clearer still in what I do: after I archive the repo following the commit, I delete the installed repo and reinstall from the archive. Hence, I test the integrity of the archive every time I create one, ensuring that every archive has been archived correctly. I'm doing my thing by myself and hence don't use a company's backup system, nor incidentally, do I use GitHub.

I'm pretty sure now that Netbeans is caching information somewhere other than /.cache/netbeans/<current-version>. I suppose therefore that all I may have to do is clean this other cache too. If you or anyone else could point me to this cache, I think I may have the problem fixed.


On 10 May 2017 at 12:24, Thomas Wolf <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Owen,
I don't pretend to be an expert on git - or any other source control system for that matter - but what you're doing seems "unusual".   If you just want to make sure the repo is backed up, why don't you just tar/zip it?  I don't know git or netbeans internals, but I can imagine how the actions you're describing might throw off file time stamps and/or netbeans caches.

I am currently in a similar boat as you: my repos are just for me.  I occasionally tar/zip them to a different drive - and depend on our company's backup software for regular backups.  I have not had the problems you describe.

tom

On May 10, 2017, at 9:16 AM, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:

Thanks Sean for your input.

I'm the only one using  my repo, and I don't want to copy or clone it. I do the stuff as described in an attempt to ensure that the repo was archived properly. I delete the installed repo, and recreate it every time I commit changes.

Is doing this causing Netbeans to make mistakes about what has been committed and what hasn't?


On 10 May 2017 at 02:43, Sean Carrick <[hidden email]> wrote:
Owen,

It seems like you are attempting to get a copy of your repo in a weird manner...

The simplest way, with Git, is to simply use the Team...Git menu with the Clone... command. Once you click on Clone..., you will be provided the opportunity to choose your Git (or GitHub) repo, provide your login credentials and clone the repo to your local system.

Once the repo is cloned to your local system, you can then edit it as you need to do and then commit the changes. After you've committed the changes to the source, you need to Push them upstream to the Git server.

I hope this helps you out.

Sean Carrick
VP Information Systems
Integrity Solutions

On Tue, 2017-05-09 at 23:29 +1000, Owen Thomas wrote:
Hmmm... Maybe this will help...

I'm a new user to Git (I migrated my work from Subversion), and some veterans may see my behaviour is a possible cause for what I'm seeing... get back to me and tell me why you would believe this if indeed you do...

When I commit a working copy, I compress the bare repo (.git directory) and archive it. I then close all four open projects that comprise my work and exit Netbeans.

I then delete the directory of the installed repo, recreate the directory, and copy the bare repo from the archive.

I reopen Netbeans after cleaning my cache directory (rm -rf * from ~/.cache/Netbeans/<current-version>). Once Netbeans is started, I open the Git Repository Browser, select the directory I have just recreated and copied the bare repo to, right click on this directory in the browser, select Checkout -> Checkout Files, check my four projects into the same directory as the bare repo is copied into, and re-open these four projects in Netbeans.

Generally, all projects come back into Netbeans as fresh copies of the repository head without any embellishments, but sometimes Netbeans tells me there are compile time errors.

These compilation errors only seem to appear when I notice that after I have committed my changes at the first step, Netbeans tells me that changes remain to be committed by showing blue cylinder embellishment next to the relevant projects. Netbeans tells me that there are no changes when I ask it to show me what the changes are by right-clicking on the installed repo directory from the Favourites view, and selecting Git -> Show Changes.

So, I hope that helps someone to help me...


On 9 May 2017 at 22:42, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
I just wanted to know if anyone had seen a similar problem to the one I am reporting. As regards reproducing anything, I can't reproduce it because I don't know why it is happening in the first place.

Thanks anyway for your reply. In as much as it might explain to me that no one has experienced any similar problem, your reply is informative to me. I'll keep looking at it and I'll post something more if I actually get some type of a handle on what is going on and it indeed appears to be something more than a user error.


On 9 May 2017 at 20:51, geertjan wielenga <[hidden email]> wrote:


Best is to provide step by step instructions for someone to reproduce the problem.

I.e., put a small sample project on GitHub and then explain step by step how to reproduce the problem with that sample.

Gj


On 9-5-2017 12:47, Owen Thomas wrote:
Hi again.

I haven't heard anything in reply to this question from the forum.

If anyone has replied to this my question, but maybe has posted their reply through the forum's web page, could you please re-post it in an email to nbusers... for some reason, the web posts don't appear in my inbox. I think this is a known problem.

  Owen.



On 8 May 2017 at 09:46, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello again.

I am seeing some issues with committing a Git code base in Netbeans.

When I commit from the root directory, I observe that some blue cylinders remain. I right-click on the root node, select Git -> Show Changes, and nothing appears. When I check out a new copy of the code base and open it in Netbeans, I get compile-time errors.

I can get rid of the errors, and in many cases, the blue cylinders also disappear - it appears that at least some of the errors correspond to changes in the code base that have occurred after the check out has happened.

Has someone seen this before, and if so, can you please tell me what's going on?

  Owen.













--
Simon Roberts
http://dancingcloudphotography.com
<a href="tel:(303)%20249-3613" value="+13032493613" target="_blank">(303) 249 3613




--
Simon Roberts
http://dancingcloudphotography.com
(303) 249 3613
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Re: Problems with Git.

Sean Carrick-4
In reply to this post by Owen Thomas-2
Owen,

It seems to me that what you are trying to do, even though you are the only one using your repo, is contrary to what repos are used for. I mean, the git system (local git server, GitHub, etc.) is set up in such a way as to maintain the changes in a file from one revision to another. By doing what you are describing doesn't seem to make any sense when using a revision control system. Your best bet, from your descriptions of your issues, would to be just to use the NetBeansProjects folder for your project(s) and archive it as you are currently attempting to do, without worrying about using git.

From the description of how you are using git, to my way of thinking, it would be like using an SQL server to store data, but extracting all of the data to a CSV or tab-separated file to actually access the data. Allowing the system to do what it is designed to do is the best option.

The advantage of being the only user of the git repo is that you know that you are the only one making changes to the contents of the repo, so there is no need to retrieve any other changes before you perform your commit. For example, when working as part of a team using a git repo, prior to making your commit, you would want to retrieve any possible changes to the file you are working on that may have been made by other team members. Once you've pulled in those changes, you could then check for any conflicts between what they did and what you did, fix the conflicts and then commit your changes.

However, the way you are working alone and wanting backups of your repo, you could use the git system, as designed, and simply create a new branch for each of your editing sessions. This way, you could use git and still have "archived" backups of each session of changes in their own right. However, at some point, you are going to want to merge each of those branches with the main project branch, which is typically called "master."

The point I'm trying to make is that it is extremely beneficial to use the tool in the manner it was designed to be used. The team that developed git put a lot of thought and concern into how it should work to accomplish what developers need to allow them to revert to a prior version of a file if a mistake has been made. My best suggestion to you is to read all of the git documentation to learn everything that it can do to save you all of this work and frustration.

Best of luck to you.

Sean Carrick
VP Information Systems
Integrity Solutions

On Wed, 2017-05-10 at 11:16 +1000, Owen Thomas wrote:
Thanks Sean for your input.

I'm the only one using  my repo, and I don't want to copy or clone it. I do the stuff as described in an attempt to ensure that the repo was archived properly. I delete the installed repo, and recreate it every time I commit changes.

Is doing this causing Netbeans to make mistakes about what has been committed and what hasn't?


On 10 May 2017 at 02:43, Sean Carrick <[hidden email]> wrote:
Owen,

It seems like you are attempting to get a copy of your repo in a weird manner...

The simplest way, with Git, is to simply use the Team...Git menu with the Clone... command. Once you click on Clone..., you will be provided the opportunity to choose your Git (or GitHub) repo, provide your login credentials and clone the repo to your local system.

Once the repo is cloned to your local system, you can then edit it as you need to do and then commit the changes. After you've committed the changes to the source, you need to Push them upstream to the Git server.

I hope this helps you out.

Sean Carrick
VP Information Systems
Integrity Solutions

On Tue, 2017-05-09 at 23:29 +1000, Owen Thomas wrote:
Hmmm... Maybe this will help...

I'm a new user to Git (I migrated my work from Subversion), and some veterans may see my behaviour is a possible cause for what I'm seeing... get back to me and tell me why you would believe this if indeed you do...

When I commit a working copy, I compress the bare repo (.git directory) and archive it. I then close all four open projects that comprise my work and exit Netbeans.

I then delete the directory of the installed repo, recreate the directory, and copy the bare repo from the archive.

I reopen Netbeans after cleaning my cache directory (rm -rf * from ~/.cache/Netbeans/<current-version>). Once Netbeans is started, I open the Git Repository Browser, select the directory I have just recreated and copied the bare repo to, right click on this directory in the browser, select Checkout -> Checkout Files, check my four projects into the same directory as the bare repo is copied into, and re-open these four projects in Netbeans.

Generally, all projects come back into Netbeans as fresh copies of the repository head without any embellishments, but sometimes Netbeans tells me there are compile time errors.

These compilation errors only seem to appear when I notice that after I have committed my changes at the first step, Netbeans tells me that changes remain to be committed by showing blue cylinder embellishment next to the relevant projects. Netbeans tells me that there are no changes when I ask it to show me what the changes are by right-clicking on the installed repo directory from the Favourites view, and selecting Git -> Show Changes.

So, I hope that helps someone to help me...


On 9 May 2017 at 22:42, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
I just wanted to know if anyone had seen a similar problem to the one I am reporting. As regards reproducing anything, I can't reproduce it because I don't know why it is happening in the first place.

Thanks anyway for your reply. In as much as it might explain to me that no one has experienced any similar problem, your reply is informative to me. I'll keep looking at it and I'll post something more if I actually get some type of a handle on what is going on and it indeed appears to be something more than a user error.


On 9 May 2017 at 20:51, geertjan wielenga <[hidden email]> wrote:


Best is to provide step by step instructions for someone to reproduce the problem.

I.e., put a small sample project on GitHub and then explain step by step how to reproduce the problem with that sample.

Gj


On 9-5-2017 12:47, Owen Thomas wrote:
Hi again.

I haven't heard anything in reply to this question from the forum.

If anyone has replied to this my question, but maybe has posted their reply through the forum's web page, could you please re-post it in an email to nbusers... for some reason, the web posts don't appear in my inbox. I think this is a known problem.

  Owen.



On 8 May 2017 at 09:46, Owen Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello again.

I am seeing some issues with committing a Git code base in Netbeans.

When I commit from the root directory, I observe that some blue cylinders remain. I right-click on the root node, select Git -> Show Changes, and nothing appears. When I check out a new copy of the code base and open it in Netbeans, I get compile-time errors.

I can get rid of the errors, and in many cases, the blue cylinders also disappear - it appears that at least some of the errors correspond to changes in the code base that have occurred after the check out has happened.

Has someone seen this before, and if so, can you please tell me what's going on?

  Owen.









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Re: Problems with Git.

Owen Thomas-2
I am so much a little developer working slowly on my own thing, and hence so far, I have had no need to conduct development down parallel branches and have to merge these branches at a later date. I'm currently using Git only as little more than a method of recording code provenance. Indeed, I suppose you're correct in concluding that I'm not using Git for anything much at all, but I hope that Git (as I intended for Subversion previously) will allow me to grow into its features when (or indeed if) I need these features.

On 11 May 2017 at 23:54, Sean Carrick <[hidden email]> wrote:
Owen,

It seems to me that what you are trying to do, even though you are the only one using your repo, is contrary to what repos are used for. I mean, the git system (local git server, GitHub, etc.) is set up in such a way as to maintain the changes in a file from one revision to another. By doing what you are describing doesn't seem to make any sense when using a revision control system. Your best bet, from your descriptions of your issues, would to be just to use the NetBeansProjects folder for your project(s) and archive it as you are currently attempting to do, without worrying about using git.

From the description of how you are using git, to my way of thinking, it would be like using an SQL server to store data, but extracting all of the data to a CSV or tab-separated file to actually access the data. Allowing the system to do what it is designed to do is the best option.

The advantage of being the only user of the git repo is that you know that you are the only one making changes to the contents of the repo, so there is no need to retrieve any other changes before you perform your commit. For example, when working as part of a team using a git repo, prior to making your commit, you would want to retrieve any possible changes to the file you are working on that may have been made by other team members. Once you've pulled in those changes, you could then check for any conflicts between what they did and what you did, fix the conflicts and then commit your changes.

However, the way you are working alone and wanting backups of your repo, you could use the git system, as designed, and simply create a new branch for each of your editing sessions. This way, you could use git and still have "archived" backups of each session of changes in their own right. However, at some point, you are going to want to merge each of those branches with the main project branch, which is typically called "master."

The point I'm trying to make is that it is extremely beneficial to use the tool in the manner it was designed to be used. The team that developed git put a lot of thought and concern into how it should work to accomplish what developers need to allow them to revert to a prior version of a file if a mistake has been made. My best suggestion to you is to read all of the git documentation to learn everything that it can do to save you all of this work and frustration.

Best of luck to you.

Sean Carrick
VP Information Systems
Integrity Solutions